The Power of Bat Photos

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Stellaluna was brilliantly written and beautifully illustrated by one of our first Bat Fans, Janell Cannon. It’s the story of a baby fruit bat who gets separated from its mother. Since publication in 1993 this book has been translated into 30 languages. Stellaluna is a classic that significantly helped to endear kids, big and small, to if not love bats, at least appreciate them better, much the same as Merlin’s photographs.

 

In fact, Janell credits Merlin’s 1986 National Geographic article “Gentle Flyers of the African Night,” about epauletted fruit bats, for inspiring Stellaluna.

Janell recently emailed Merlin to share one of her community presentations, explaining how much she appreciated free use of his website photos. We love, love, love this kind of feedback! It Illustrates one of the many ways our website photos are making a difference for bats. As Bat Fan numbers grow, we’re happy to see the wide variety of creative uses individuals and institutions are making of our website gallery. Please share with us how you’re using our photos in your corner of the world to make it better for bats and people. (more…)

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Progress for bats via New Scientist – a call to action! 11/5/15

Lasionycteris noctivagans, U.S.In its February 8, 2014 issue, New Scientist published one of the worst scare stories ever titled, Contagion: Hordes of deadly diseases are lurking in bats and sometimes jumping to people. Can we prevent a major pandemic, asks Carrie Arnold.” Merlin and leading colleagues wrote rebuttals, and we asked our Bat Fan friends to join in the protest. Now we’re asking just the opposite!

Please thank them for much appreciated progress (no need to mention the past, just thanks for recently positive portrayals). Leave your comments in the Message Box, selecting Editorial/Content.

In their February 18, 2015 issue New Scientist collaborated with Merlin to publish a story on woolly bats living in pitcher plants that stated, “Contrary to common misconceptions, bats in general are gentle, highly intelligent and trainable.” On October 14, 2015 they published an extensive review of Merlin’s new book, The Secret Lives of Bats that included a strong presentation of bat values, debunked needless fears and showcased 11 portraits of cute bats.

We deeply appreciate all our colleagues and Bat Fans who are participating in making so much progress possible. Together, we can indeed change the future!

https://subscribe.newscientist.com/myaccount/NeedHelp.aspx

 

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